ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A massive divide over how to regulate the use of body cameras could hang up legislation as the state's largest police department deploys the technology this year in Minneapolis.

Dozens of Minnesota agencies are already using the portable recording devices. The Legislature has struggled for more than a year to craft a law balancing law enforcement's surveillance priorities with concerns about providing transparency.

House Republican leadership on Wednesday pulled a pair of bills from hearings scheduled for Thursday as top lawmakers in their party differ greatly in how to set regulations.

One major hang-up is whether to require permission before filming inside homes. Rep. Peggy Scott wants that protection, but other legislators and police officials say it's burdensome.

Minneapolis police are set to start deploying the technology permanently this spring.

The Rochester Police Department recently began using the devices after a community commission developed new policies to deal with privacy concerns. The Olmsted County Sheriff's Department has been waiting for action on the issue by the State Legislature.